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Life’s true colors exposed in black-and-white photos

Mei+Young+sits+in+the+courtyard+next+to+the+Art+Gallery.+Young+is+an+advanced+photographer+who+uses+a+film+camera+and+likes+to+develop+photos+in+black-and-white.+Photo+credit%3A+Jo+Rankin
Mei Young sits in the courtyard next to the Art Gallery. Young is an advanced photographer who uses a film camera and likes to develop photos in black-and-white. Photo credit: Jo Rankin

Mei Young sits in the courtyard next to the Art Gallery. Young is an advanced photographer who uses a film camera and likes to develop photos in black-and-white. Photo credit: Jo Rankin

Mei Young sits in the courtyard next to the Art Gallery. Young is an advanced photographer who uses a film camera and likes to develop photos in black-and-white. Photo credit: Jo Rankin

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She takes black-and-white photographs to show the world that there is more to life than color, adding mystery, soul and a desire for peace in her photos.

Mei Young, 58, English and photography major, has been studying at El Camino for over a year now. She is an advanced photography student, only shooting black-and-white photos.

“(It) triggers people in different ways,” Young said. “The more I work in black and white, (the more it) makes me want to stick to black-and-white only.”

Having no real inspiration, photography was a childhood dream of hers. She gave praise to her parents who were very encouraging and supportive in her interests. Young also said a female’s opinion is not considered much in her culture, but her family was different.

“Mei is an exceptionally hard working and talented artist,” Darilyn Rowan, photography professor, said. “She works tirelessly to study the art of photography and produces beautiful work.”

Her photographs not only revolve around Zen and Buddhist ideas, but she also takes photos of nature, loving the hikes and outdoor scenery in the Sequoias, Red Woods and their family road trip to Indiana.

Young’s black and white photographs are something people aren’t used to looking for, Susan St. Marie, intermediate and advanced photography professor, said.

Young’s love for nature allows her to look at the world around her through a different perspective, giving her a better idea on what she wants the photos to portray. One of Young’s photos is a picture of a tree, and, to her, it represents a person.

When Young isn’t capturing life’s beautiful moments with the camera she’s had since the 1980s, she practices tai chi on top of being a mother and a wife.

As a student, Young also worked with Maria Andrade Reyes, 35, photography major.

“It is pleasant to see how she does not stop, instead continues creating beautiful photographs.” Reyes said.

Since late April, Young’s work has been displayed at the Lomeli’s Italian Restaurant in Gardena where seven of her photographs are on display for customers to see.

Young found that it would be a great place to hold her exhibit there because it was not only part of her assignment but her family always comes to eat at the restaurant. She also has had her work displayed twice at the school library here on campus.

Young believes in a calm and peaceful world where people understand one another and keep an open mind to the things that some people aren’t open to seeing. Her photographs are a mirror image of what she believes, displaying that of a feeling of tranquility and expressing that photography is one of her best interests.

“Being in the dark room for four or five hours, you may not get a good picture, but you learn so much,” Young said.

Young believes in a place where the world should be at peace.

“When there are problems or issues, there will always be someone who will step in to make things easier,” she said. “I think this is the ideal world.”

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Life’s true colors exposed in black-and-white photos