El Camino gets Grammy-nominated quartet performance

Four people walked on stage, dressed in all black, they began the show with a bow and took positions behind their first instrument of the night.

The Grammy-nominated Los Angeles Percussion Quartet put on a performance in the Marsee Auditorium Friday night.

Matt Cook, Justin Dehart, Nick Terry and Cory Hills are the original members of the quartet and have been together since 2009.

“Everything you’re going to hear tonight is a work in progress for our third album,” Cook said.

The performance was interesting and different from what is normally shown at the Marsee Auditorium.

“It’s just amazing, a different side of music i’ve never seen before,” Celestine Hale, 44, business administration, said.

Applause filled the room and then quickly silenced as the lights shined on the gold and silver instruments in front of the red felt backdrop.

As each member added their instrument to the song, a light would shine on them.

As the concert went on, everyone in the audience was still and silent, focusing and waiting for the next note or surprising bass to fill up the auditorium. The focus and passion showed in the quartet’s eyes as they performed each piece.

They moved from the various instruments on the stage making sounds from twangy strings to soft chimes to loud bass.

Their bodies moved with every note they hit.

To keep the audience on their toes, the quartet walked off the stage.

Silence and confusion came from the entire audience. Each member of the quartet was at a different instrument on the aisles of the auditorium. The light shined on one member at a time as they played their instrument.

The people in the audience turned their heads from right to left trying to see the performance in it’s entirety. Other audience members looked down and closed their eyes to soak up the music.

“It made me feel like I was at the ocean or on the beach,” Deborah Tejada, 21, music, said.

The members of the quartet used the instruments in unusual ways. Not one instrument went unnoticed as they played in sync.

“It’s a new world to me,” Aurelio Esparza, 20, sociology, said.

The entire show, the quartet communicated only using their instruments and eyes. They ended each song with a bow continued with applause from the crowd. The members stayed humble and thanked everyone for coming to the show and encouraged them to check out the CD.